Takahiko Iimura

Concept tape 1 (Identity) (1990) VHS NTSC, color, 31 min

Genre: Experimental

Compilation tapes excerpted from conceptual works Iimura produced from1970 through 1990, and assembled according to the theme:1) Identity, 2) Derrida and Phenomenology, 3) Performance.(T. I.) "Iimura is a significant and singular filmmaker, but also one of the most important 'conceptual' artists working in any medium." -- Malcom Le Grice, TimeOut, April 1975, London. video sale price: $50

Rental: $50.00
VHS NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Concept tape 2 (Derrida and Phenomenology) (1991) VHS NTSC, color, 25 min

Genre: Experimental

See description of Concept tape 1 video sale price: $50

Rental: $50.00
VHS NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Concept tape 3 (Performance) (1991) VHS NTSC, color, 25 min

Genre: Experimental

See description of Concept tape 1 video sale price: $50

Rental: $50.00
VHS NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Ma: A Japanese Concept (1978 / 1989) VHS NTSC, color, 38 min

Genre: Experimental

1) MA: SPACE/TIME IN THE GARDEN OF RYOAN-JI (1989) color, sound, 16 min. music: Takehisa Kosugi, Text : Arata Isozaki. Produced for Program for Art on Film, joint venture of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and The Paul Getty Trust "The early sixteenth-century Japanese garden in the Zen temple of Ryoan-ji, in Kyoto, is considered a masterpiece of the karesansui or "dry landscape" style... In this film, the viewer is invited to experience the garden as an embodiment of ma, a Japanese concept that conveys both time and space... The aesthetic of the film is the message, it has the quality of an experimental film, a conceptual film-an artwork in itself. Good balance of music/visuals/titles. If not as compelling for some viewers as for others, still rated as very effective. Makes one want to visit the actual garden and experience its spiritual energy." -- Art on Screen, edited by Nadine Covert, New York 2) MA (Intervals) (1975-78) b&w/color, sound, 22 min. video sale price: $70

Rental: $70.00
VHS NTSC Rental: $70.00

Takahiko Iimura

Ai (Love) (1962) 16mm, black and white, 10 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: Art & Artists

Sound by Yoko Ono "I have seen a number of Japanese avant-garde films at Brussels International Experimental Film Festival, at Cannes and at other places. Of all those films, Iimura's LOVE stands out in its very beauty and originality, a film poem, with no usual pseudo-surrealist imagery. Closest comparison would be Brakhage's LOVING or Jack Smith's FLAMING CREATURES. ... [A] poetic and sensuous exploration of the body ... fluid, direct, beautiful." -- Jonas Mekas, Film Culture

Rental: $40.00
16mm Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

Iro (Colors) (1962) 16mm, color, 10 min

Genre: Experimental

Music by Yasunao Tone "A striking experiment in color in which paints are transformed in oil and water, in which melting waxes are mixed, the result being a metamorphosis from one color to the next." -- Donald Richie, written for the program note 1969.

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Kuzu (Junk) (1962) 16mm, black and white, 10 min

Genre: Experimental

Music by Takehisa Kosugi The beach of Tokyo Bay was a dumpsite for all the city's human, animal and industrial wastes when I shot "Junk" there in the early 60s - today this is no longer the case. I was interested in the way my commitment could revive the junk and dead animals. At times the objects are animated, which could be seen as surreal, yet they are real at the same time. The concept coincides with the Neo-Dada in art, in which junk is assembled and incorporated into artwork. Yet today's point of view, the film certainly shows concern with the ecology and may be regarded as an early attempt to deal with the destruction of our environment. "I went to an industrial beach where there was a lot of junk. Some poor people lived there collecting garbage. I shot some of the garbage and also kids playing around there. What I tried to do was to make some conjunction between the things and kids. I also wanted to participate in the film myself. I ran on the beach holding the camera, and I shot my own shadow and footsteps". - Scott McDonald, An interview with Taka Iimura, on the Journal of the University Film Association,1981

Rental: $40.00
16mm Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

On Eye Rape (1962) 16mm, black and white, 10 min

Co-produced with Natsuyuki Nakanishi A found educational film about the sex of plants and animals was punched with big holes in almost every frame throughout the film by myself and an artist friend Natsuyuki Nakanishi who found the film in a garbage. At several points there are inserts of a few frames of a pornographic photo (which would work on a subliminal sense) in which the sex part was covered by black. The film is an irony and at the same time a protest against sex censorship in Japan at the time in which pornographic scenes had to be covered by black. At the end we even punched holes in these subliminal pictures, thereby "censoring" the censored image. A superior work. Considering the whole situation of film/image works at the time, one could say that this is an exceptional film. The film was picked up from garbage by Nakanishi and then Iimura punched with holes throughout the film. The work, which directly attacks both the film physically and the eyes of the audience, was Iimura's first film (according to the filmography) as well as the first master piece which relates to his later film works of conceptual-art." Masaaki Hirakata, from catalogue "META MEDIA", Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, 1995

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Anma (The Massure) (1963) 16mm, DVD NTSC, black and white, 13 min

Genre: Experimental

"Anma (The Masseur)" by the Butoh dance creator and a legendary figure, Tatsumi Hijikata, is a classic piece of Butoh of Japan. Butoh, an original style of modern dance in Japan, had begun with his performance. The film was realized not only as a dance document but also as a Cine-Dance, a performance with a camera. The filmmaker "performed" himself with a camera among the dancers on the stage in front of the audience. Also with a duet by Tatsumi Hijikata and Kazuo Ohno, the main characters of Butoh, this film had a rare appearance of them in Butoh history. "(Through this film,) it became clear that the Black Butoh Dance created by Tatsumi Hijikata is closer to the neo-dada movement taking over the provocative, cynical and absurd forms rather than the German expressionist dance usually connected." -- Nicolas Villodre, curator of Cinematheque Francaise, Paris Collection of Lincoln Center, Performing Arts, New York

Rental: $60.00
16mm Rental: $60.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Onan (1963) 16mm, black and white, 7 min

Music by Yasunao Tone This film narratives the story of young man who makes holes on nude photographs with a heated stick and later gives birth to a hue plastic egg (an art work of Natzuyuki Nakanishi who plays the role of the young man). "ONAN is a work about desire (masterbation) which has no object but itself. The appearance of the large egg objectifies the man's desires. After colliding with the other (a girl), the hero falls down while still holding the egg, thus caricaturing the desire of the hero. "The basis framework of the story is conventional, yet Iimura's way of telling is lift me with a new knowledge of love. What more can you ask of a film? For example, with all the expert gyrations of Bressons's film, BALTHAZAR, (which is about love too) it seemed to me just a remake of some very tired sentiments. ONAN shows, at least to me, that Iimura can handle narrative material where most avant gardists fear to tread. At the root, Iimura seems to have a feature-film-maker's sensibility." -- Carl Linder, Film Culture 44, Spring 67 "In Onan (1962) a young man becomes aroused by looking at pictures of naked women in girlie magazines. He makes several visually-startling attacks on the photographs with a penile-looking stick he has heated in a hibachi; then he apparently masturbates. Later we see the man rolling around on the bed until he gives birth to a large egg, made of some synthetic substance. After rubbing the egg all over his body, he runs outside and offers it to a woman; her refusal causes him to lie down in a fetal position which he maintains until the end of the film. Onan suggests the essentially furstrating lifelessness of eroticism based on the callous exploitation of the female body. The implication seems to be that the sadistic attitude toward women revealed in the man's attacks on the photographs ultimately renders him an eternal baby in this real relationships with women." -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage, April, 1978

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Rose Color Dance (1963) 16mm, black and white, 13 min

Genre: Experimental

A document (or what I call "cinedance") of Tatsumi Hijikata's Butoh dance with Kazuo Ohno as the guest dancer shot in Hijikata's early period when he was emerging as the originator of Butoh. All of the male dancers are dressed u p with evening suits and move gracefully, yet an intruder breaks up the whole scene abruptly. The film is worth seeing, even if just to see a memorable gay duet of Hijikata and Ohno. Overexposed, washed out images are sandwiched among normal ones.

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Sakasama (Upside Down) (1963) 16mm, color, 13 min

Genre: Experimental

Filmed turning the camera upside down the scene of people, a girl, amusement park, beach, etc. without looking through the viewfinder.

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Dance Party in the Kingdom of Lilliput No. 1, A (1964) 16mm, black and white, 14 min

Genre: Experimental

A surper-real comedy with Sho Kazakura. The film is divided into a number of very short scenes or chapters, each with a title at random. we see him lame in a crowd, see him running up stairs, see him absolutely naked, watch him urinate, etc. An anthology of discontinuous happenings and events. "(The film) is related more to 'structuralist' films, the image of a naked man being presented as chapters; the sequence is like moving stills, or short statements conveyed by mean of gestures. Each sequence is preceded by a title. Just as a concrete poem consists of words grouped together according to sound, and not necessarily according to meaning, so in this film the image are grouped together according to how to look and not necessarily according to what they meean. Perhaps it would be more accurate to call what are generally known as 'structural' films 'concrete'." -- Stephen Dowskin, Film Is, 1975 "The movie may well be one of the first 'Conceptual' film ever made anywhere in the world. It was a rather slow, but clerly defined daily motions of Kazakura, a mysterious underground figure of Japan, who is still unknow in Tokyo, yet has a strange presence in his remote area of Japan, KYUSYU island." -- Nam June Paik, 1987

Rental: $56.00
16mm Rental: $56.00

Takahiko Iimura

Dance Party In The Kingdom of Lilliput Nos. 1 and 2, A (Dual Projection Version) (1964/66) 16mm, black and white, 13 min

Genre: Experimental

For side-by-side dual projection. Includes "A Dance Party in the Kingdom of Lilliput No. 1" (1964) and "A Dance Party in the Kingdom of Lilliput No. 2" (1966). The second version of this title (#2) uses the same film as the original version (#1), which has many "chapters" such as "Mr. K, A,B,C,.." etc. However, the second version reorganizes the chapters from the original in a different order. In addition, the picture has scratches, erasures, and holes punched on the original version.

Rental: $75.00
16mm Rental: $75.00

Takahiko Iimura

I Saw the Shadow (1966) 16mm, black and white, 13 min

Genre: Experimental

With Akiko Iimura Only film I ever made with a narrative and was shot entirely of the shadows of the hero who is the cameraman.

Rental: $50.00
16mm Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Taka and Ako (1966) 16mm, black and white, 13 min

Genre: Experimental

A double portrait of Taka and Ako (Akiko) who are shooting each other with their albums.

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Filmmakers (1969) DVD NTSC, VHS NTSC, color, 30 min

Genre: Experimental

This is a film portrait of filmmakers whom I was most interested in at the time; Stan Brakhage, Stan Vanderbeek, Jack Smith, Jonas Mekas, Andy Warhol, and Takahiko Iimura, shot during my first visit in U. S. A., 1966-1968, and the n completed in Japan, 1969 with "comments" literally pointing out in words w hat I see in the picture at the moment (like an English lesson). Each filmmaker's part is about 5 minutes (200 feet) (except Iimura, 50 feet) without editing but in camera, most is shot without looking through the viewfinder. A part of Jonas Mekas is shot by himself and Akiko Iimura. Intentionally the film "borrowed" the technique of the filmmaker in his part (ex. frame-by frame shot at the part of Jonas Mekas as he has often employed it in his film). Collection of Anthology Film Archives, New York. Also available in video from Arthouse, New York

Rental: $60.00 DVD/VHS rental price 50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $60.00
VHS NTSC Rental: $60.00

Takahiko Iimura

Film Strips I (1970) 16mm, black and white, 11.5 min

Genre: Experimental

As suggested earlier, the best work of Iimura's middle period is characterized by increasingly formal concerns, concerns most effectively demonstrated by Film Strips I and II (1967-70). Each straddles the normal distinction between narrative and abstract film by presenting imagery which, though clearly representational, is not identifiable because of the formal effects of the processes Iimura used. What is most exciting about Film Strips II is the fact that the complex, untried process Iimura developed to make the film resulted in an experience which is not only interesting visually, but which is implicitly a powerful record of a painful time and a warning about the future. Because of the speed with which the imagery tumbles through the center of the frame at the beginning of the film, the viewer may not even realize that photographed images are involved. Instead, a pulsating center of energy seems to go through a kind of fission process. Though the imagery does grow increasingly recognizable as blacks, policemen, signs, flags, and so forth, the viewer cannot tell that as specific an event as a riot in Detroit is involved. Instead, the violent images appear to record a wide range of social and political conflicts." -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage, April, 1978

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Film Strips II (1970) 16mm, black and white, 13.5 min

Genre: Experimental

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

New York Scene (1967) 16mm, , 35 min

Genre: Experimental

A juxtaposition of New York's street and indoor scenes was shot in the method of one roll (50feet) for one scene, alternating monochrome and color in every other scene. Mostly the scenes are isolated, individual scenes, not connected to each other such as a sunny building in the shade, a fire hydrant at the street corner, a girl with the magnifying glass on her eye, a female lying nude in the dark, a film maker (Jack Smith) with his film "Flaming Creatures" projected behind him, and so on.

Rental: $50.00
16mm Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

White Calligraphy (1967) 16mm, black and white, 18.5 min

Genre: Experimental

"In my view the most interesting of Iimura's early films -- at least those I've had a chance to see -- is the one least characteristic of this period: WHITE CALLIGRAPHY. To make this abstract film, Iimura drew the Japanese characters for the Kojiki, 'the oldest story in Japan,' directly onto dark leader. Since each frame contains a different character, the finished film creates a continually changing retinal collage, which is interrupted intermittently during the final minutes of the film by movements of dark leader. All in all, WHITE CALLIGRAPHY is a sort of filmic concrete poem ...." -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage

Rental: $40.00
16mm Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

Summer, Happenings, U. S. A. (1968) 16mm, black and white, 28 min

Genre: Experimental

I lived in the East village of New York in the mid sixties, a high time of the hippie movement. I had been involved myself in the environment of the subculture and the political climate of the time and worked with the camera and tape recorder almost everyday. The result is a political/social collage of the time: Vietnam war, black riots on the TV screen, the anti-war movement, hippies sit-in, homeless people on the street. These images are juxtaposed and interwoven with the sounds of TV war reports, black power agitation, antiwar slogans, Hare Krishna chanting, and dog howling. The repeated phrase of a popular song is heard: "There is something going on, and you don't know what it is, Mr Jones." Shot with out-dated army supply raw stock, which often has uneven quality, and developed by myself, who failed to properly handle the stock, and I got 'strange' effects such as overexposed night scenes turned into day scenes. An experimental processing. One of the few politically motivated films I have ever made. "Seeing the film, one should imagine how Iimura himself has been liberated in a foreign country. Of course, the liberation was spiritual as well as phisical. For him at that time the rule and the convention of the established movie seemed too strict and boring. Right! Iimura is singing a kind of freedom in this film." -- Kenji Harada, On Takahiko iimura, Kore ga Eigada(This is Movie)

Rental: $55.00
16mm Rental: $55.00

Takahiko Iimura

Face (1969) 16mm, color, 20.5 min

Genre: Experimental

With Donna Kerness, Mario Montez and Linda The three faces (two women and one tranvestized man) in the series of close u p, which are shot separately in their sexual process of the acting and the real, are intercut and edited making into a film. The sound is the voice of continuous laughing of a woman repeated from a loop-tape. What I try to realize in this film is the question of gender through the facial expression in sex between woman and tranvestized man, and the image in detail between the ac ting and the real life. When these factors are mixed, one can hardly distinguish one from the other.

Rental: $50.00
16mm Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Buddha Again (a. k. a. Cosmic Buddha) (1970) 16mm, color, 16.25 min

Genre: Experimental

Originally filmed in 8mm a little stone-made Buddha in a temple of Katmandu, the film strip in ten seconds was projected as a loop, and then the screen w as refilmed many times in 16mm at different speeds (frames per second). The original 8mm footage has been greatly expanded through refilming in 16mm. The rhythmic manipulation of "flying Buddha" in the air is realized.

Rental: $40.00
16mm Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

In The River (1971) 16mm, color, 19.5 min

Genre: Experimental

Katmudu Series #1: the basic footage was shot in the Katmundu area, and is of a man taking a bath in a sacred river. The image was repeated and superimposed in a viewer and then reshoot. The original footage was lengthened considerably by this process. "The film concerns itself structurally with prolonging the time of a minimal action. My evaluation of what happens in Iimura's films is that a mystical reality emerges from exploring a subject like this in great detail - in getting into it, seeing it uncommonly, focusing on it, by being forced to observe its subtle changes. It somehow enables us to see into it. It is as if perception were carried by a swift current, when film images are seen in normal progression; but when the film slows and eddites around a single boulder-like image, viewer's perception sinks to deeper levels." -- Carl Linder, Filmmaking, 1976 "A different sort of formal investigation resulted in In the River. Again, Iimura used the process of re-photography, but in this instance, the screen was the tiny viewer of a 16mm editor. Using various camera speeds and in-camera superimpositions, Iimura analyzed some footage he had made in katmandu of a man taking a bath in a sacred river. The finished film develops an interesting parallel between the man's careful bathing as the river flows past and Iimura's careful analysis of the man's physically simple activities as the film flows through the camera. The spiritual illumination the man receives is reflected by the mandala-like circular illumination created by the flickering light of the 16mm viewer. A meditational experience is, thus, presented in a film whose minimal action and quiet pace can create meditational possibilities for viewers." -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage, April, 1978

Rental: $40.00
16mm Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

Chair & Blinking, A (1970) DVD NTSC, black and white, 8 min

Genre: Experimental

One of the earliest minimalist video with flicker effects was produced as a pair piece in Tokyo in early 1970s. First, a chair with its shadow flickers while synchronizing with white noise on a TV monitor. Second, another flickering video with eyes, which super-impose the positive over the negative, open and close rapidly. At the same time the "blind" effects of video fast-forwarding accelerates/decelerates the picture synchronized with the sound. --T. I.

Rental: $50.00 sale price: 70.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Kiri (Fog) (1970) 16mm, black and white, 5 min

Genre: Experimental

16mm, blow up from Regular 8mm. Almost entirely white scenes in which faintly seen trees are restlessly blown by wind through fog, and then suddenly disappear into a pure white. Is a landscape film in the tradition of San-Sui-Ga (Japanese style of black and white landscape drawing) and is a kind of haiku film as well.

Rental: $20.00
16mm Rental: $20.00

Takahiko Iimura

Pacific Ocean, The (1971) 16mm, color, 30 min

Genre: Experimental

When crossing the Pacific Ocean by boat, which took 12 days, I was looking at only the horizon, and this is what I saw.

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Yoko Ono: This Is Not Here (1971) DVD NTSC, color, 18 min

Genre: Experimental

"Takahiko Iimura is not an ordinary artist. He is undoubtedly one of the first Japanese artists, along with Yoko Ono and Ryuichi Sakamoto gain substantial international reputation... An emotionally moving film documentary of Yoko Ono and John Lennon. "Carl Eugene Loeffler, Artcom, President, San Francisco This is a Region Free DVD

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Shutter (1971) 16mm, black and white, 25 min

Genre: Experimental

Music by Keijiro Sato SHUTTER marks a further step in Iimura's developing interest in formal concerns. Using two projector speeds and various camera speeds, he photographed the light thrown onto a screen by a projector with no film running through it. Because of the disparities between the speeds of the camera and projector shutters, the resulting footage, which he printed first in positive, then in negative, creates a series of flicker effects. -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage, April, 1978

Rental: $50.00
16mm Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Models: A-1: 2 Min. 46 Sec. 16 Frames (1972) 16mm, black and white, 9 min

Genre: Experimental

By using simple systems of counting and measuring in film, Iimura has drawn attention to the complexities of our time perception -- memory, rhythm, phase -- and the interaction between coucious conception of time, and the physical perception of its passing. Iimura is a significant and singular filmmaker, but also one of the most important 'conceptual' artist working in any medium. -- Malcolm Le Grice, Time Out, April 1975, London

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Models: A-2: Timing 1, 2, 3, 4 (1972) 16mm, black and white, 11.5 min

Genre: Experimental

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Models: A-3: Time Length 1,2,3,4 (1972) 16mm, black and white, 12 min

Genre: Experimental

"These two reels (A-1~4, B-1~4) of MODELS I think are unusually important works. You are certainly one of the filmmakers to so explicitly direct your effort to the amazing aesthetic question of the internal calibration of consciousness. It is a work, which so completely bares the brain of its receiver that the total life message can transmit across the thread of your work directly, without complication, or artifice or diversion. Such complete communication has crossed the boundaries of embarrassment and speaks in a voice of convincing spirituality" -- Tony Conrad, in a note to Iimura, February 20, 1974

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Models: A-4: Timed 1,2,3 (1972) 16mm, black and white, 7.5 min

Genre: Experimental

"As the title suggests, Models defines the general concerns which characterize Iimura's nonphotographic films. The most important of these concerns is his exploration of the real space and time of film experience. Models presents eight different forms of this exploration, each of which involves a different set of basis variables. A description of the first section of the film will give an idea of Iimura's method and of some of its revelations. All in all, the number of interesting filmic explorations in the eight sections of Models makes it one of Iimura's most impressive films" -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage, April, 1978

Rental: $30.00
16mm Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Models: B-1: Counting, 100 Or X's (1972) 16mm, b&w, 11.5 min

Models, Reel 2 (B-1~4) consists of four works and is dealt with, different from Reel 1, symbol/words, and the logic in film. First "Counting 1 to 100 or X" is made of four 100feet films and the number of 1 to 100 are replaced by multiplied (10, 20,40,80) Xs, which may be "read" as numbers through repeated perception. "Seeing, not Seeing" is dealt with the relation of light and darkness to the words. At first "Seeing" is followed by light and "Not Seeing" by darkness using clear and black leaders respectively and second time it is re versed as "Seeing" by darkness and "Not Seeing" by light with certain duration every time. Next "To See the Frame, Not To See The Frame" shows the reversed relation of the frame between film (as the material) and screen (as the space). At first in "To See the Frame", the visible black frame of film is in visible on screen while the invisible clear frame of film is visible on screen.

Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Models: B-2: A Line 1, 2, 3 (1972) 16mm, b&w, 9.5 min

Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

Models: B-3: To See the Frame, Not to See the Frame (1972) 16mm, b&w, 11.5 min

Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Models: B-4: Seeing, Not Seeing (1972) 16mm, b&w, 4 min

Rental: $30.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

1 To 60 Seconds (1973) 16mm, b&w, 30.5 min

"In 1 to 60 Seconds Iimura does an extraordinary thing: he abstracts time from any concrete associations, seems to put it on the screen and there you sit looking at (or for) it, experiencing it. The film is all black leader except for the numbers 1 to 60 that appear individually in sequence to indicate t he amount of time in seconds that each of them followed one second letter by a number or numbers indicate the total amount of time that has thus far transpired. So at each juncture you know beforehand how much time awaits you be fore the next and how much is behind you, and then it's just you and the black screen. And thereafter many things happen: you attempt to experience, say, twenty one seconds so accurately you will be ready for the 22, or you become impatient and bored, or you just feel time, fell the ongoingness. The film's as varied as time (for you) is and can be." -- Paul Poggiali, The Soho Weekly News, New York, May 9, 1974

Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

+ & - (Plus and Minus) (1973) , min

"Of the new foreign work I saw, (at the Avantgarde Film Festival in London) t hat of Taka Iimura interested me most -- His film + & -, using scratched sign, displayed how perception can be molded by concept. By postulating negative duration -- a length of black, say six seconds, minus a length of white, say three seconds, equals a length of black three seconds -- the gradually emerging experience of 'backward-running' duration, through a long series of these visual sums, was very surprising." Malcolm Le Grice, Studio International, Nov., 1973 "During the past five years the concerns which Iimura explored in Models have reached their most complete refinement in + & -, 1to 60 Seconds, and 24 Frames Per Second. -- For those who do come to Iimura's films feeling oblige d to sit in a theater and concentrate on a screen and assuming that the filmmaker will reward their effort and discipline by providing something to look at, +&- (and in particular, Iimura's presentation of a complete set of additions and a complete set of subtractions) can create considerable frustration. Clearly, however, Iimura's decision to present both halves of what he views as a complete film experience is not made in the interests of pleasing everyone. Like most works of art, + & - is exhibited in the hope that some port ion of those who attend a screening will be flexible enough to develop ways of relating to the film which will enable them to get something out of the experience Iimura has provided." -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage, April, 1978

Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

Parallel (1974) , min

"Two vertical parallel lines -- one photographed, the other scratched into d ark leader -- are presented in a variety of configurations which dramatize what Iimura sees as the fundamental disparity between the totemic tendencies o f photographic illusionism (the photographic line is monolithical formal an d still) and somehow more personal, more human tendencies of the direct manipulation of film as a plastic material (the scratched line is consistently 'a live', consistently moving and changing). --Scott MacDonald, Afterimage, April 1978 "Iimura's two straight lines, and his two mutually generating and canceling frames, are the best metaphor to approach his film art. Actually, this is al ways lying on a tightrope between physical and abstract, historical surrealism re-elaborated through an exquisitely Eastern sensibility and typically American underground structuralism, which Iimura felt so akin to his own concerns." -- Bruno Di Marino, From "Time" to "See You", catalog of Takahiko Iimura, Istituto Giapponese di Cultura, Rome, 1977

Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

24 Frames Per Second (1975) , min

"This film and in particular the function of sound within it will vary freely from moment to moment, viewer to viewer. Totally different in its physical surface from most of the sound films of the 1970s, the film's openness of articulation of sound stands as an emblem for the new investigations of sound-image relationship during this period. Allowing the full force of its meaningful symbolic oppositions between black and white, silence and sound, to resonate, the film brings these issues forth within [the] larger context of its (and the viewer's) probing of the nature, the limits and the possibilities of human consciousness." -- Larry Gottheim, 10 Years of Living Cinema "Both in terms of its examination of time and space, of light and darkness, of visuals and sounds; and in terms of its demands and potential rewards for an audience, 24 FRAMES PER SECOND is the quintessential Iimura film." -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage

Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

24 Frames Per Second (Revised) (1975) , min

Restructured version in which the positive and the negative of the frame(s): white frame(s) in black, and black frame(s) in white within one second(24 frames) come out one after the other. In a way, ancient Chinese symbol of Ying and Yang is translated in filmic time where the double structure of the positive and the negative ends up to the opposite: the positive becomes the negative and vice versa.

Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Observer/Observed (1999) DVD NTSC, color, 22 min

Genre: Experimental

Consisting of three pieces: 1) "Camera, Monitor, Frame" (1976) 8 min. 2) "Observer/Observed" (1975) 8 min. 3) "Observer/Observed/Observer" (1976) 6 min. A multimedia with video, text, graphics and animation, and is interactive among them. With Takahiko iimura and Kazuyo Yasuda. Co-production with the Banff Centre for the Arts, Banff, Canada and Euphonic Inc., Tokyo "Iimura is at his best deconstructing and reconstructing the video apparatus. Elemental and elegant, these works confront issues of language and semiotics through forms of direct address. Incisively presented, this CD-ROM offers a new generation access to classic works of video art and theory" -- Peter d'Agostino, professor of media arts, Temple University, Philadelphia Awarded, Director's Choice Award, Black Maria Film & Video Festival, Jersey City, 1998, and Bronze Prize, New York Expo Festival, New York, 2000. (All video version) (specify desired format DVD or CD-ROM)

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Ma (Intervals) (1977) , min

"When we see "Ma (Intervals)", we have a visual perceptional experience, and at the same time we are made conscious about the universal and conceptual time which is measured by clock." -- Kenji Harada, This is Movie No. 6, On Takahiko Iimura, 1994, Tokyo. "MA", a Japanese concept of time/space as one is interpreted in the sense o f intervals in film in which only the segments of light and darkness, and a white line and a black line all measured by 1,2,3 seconds are seen and perceived.

Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Sync Sound (1978) , min

Using the system of academy leader: 10 to 1, the film replaces the number to white space with bip sound (clear leader) gradually until it reaches to complete white.

Rental: $30.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

One Frame Duration (1977) , 12 min

"Iimura, who is Japan's most important filmmaker, was involved in the New American Cinema developments in the early sixties. His work has continued to open up new ground in a way which few of his contemporaries from that period managed to sustain." -- Malcolm LeGrice, Time Out "The achievements of Iimura's recent films, particularly when combined with his many videotapes (themselves an interesting topic for extended discussion) and his numerous film and video installation pieces, make him one of the most interesting and prolific artists around. Like Carl Andre and Richard Serra in sculpture, Emmett Williams and Richard Kostelanetz in poetry, and Frank Stella and Josef Albers in painting, Iimura is able to refresh our ability to perceive and understand all film by reducing the variables vying for our attention so fully that we can concentrate completely on crucial elements of the film experience we often ignore." -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage

Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Talking Picture (The Structure of Film Viewing) (1981-2009) DVD NTSC, color & b/w, 23 min

Genre: Experimental

"In this collection of videos, Talking Picture (The Structure of Film Viewing) and Shadowman (The Structure of Seeing and Hearing), Takahiko Iimura presents a series of mind-twisting videos, meditating on the experience of watching film/ video, and of seeing and being seen. Prodded by a succession of riddles, the videos are lined with humor..., Iimura touches on a range of significant philosophical questions about linguistics and the nature of representation itself. While watching these videos one is likely to entertain comparisons to Plato's Allegory of the Cave, Rene Magrittes's This is not a pipe, and the analytic tradition of semiotics. Iimura also draws some tantalizing parallels between some of these Western philosophical inquiries with Asian concepts of representation; for instance, in Shadowman, Iimura observes that the Japanese word fro film, eiga, literally means "reflected picture," the kanji character come from the Chinese literally means "electric shadow picture," pointing back to Plato's Cave." - Aaron Michael Kerner, San Francisco State University

Rental: $70.00

Takahiko Iimura

A Journey to Ayer Rock (1985) , min

Consisting of two videos: 1) MOMENTS AT THE ROCK (1984) color, sound, 12 min. Grand Prize, Edison Black Maria International Film/Video Festival, 1986 "Very alluring... The pace of the images and sounds become hypnotic, and creates a sense of "dream time," something basic to the Aboriginal monuments itself." Carl E. Leoffler 2) EXCERPTS FROM (AYERS ROCK) (1985) color, sound, 20 min. video sale price: $70

Rental: $70.00

Takahiko Iimura

John Cage Performs James Joyce (1985) DVD NTSC, b/w, 15 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: literary_theatre, music

Sound by and with John Cage Document of a voice performance by John Cage who 'reads', 'vocalizes' and 'whispers' in three different manners his artificial language taken from 'Finnegens Wake' by James Joyce. Cage freely composed the letters according toa chance operation using the I-Ching.

Rental: $60.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $60.00

Takahiko Iimura

Ma: Space/Time in the Garden of Ryoan-Ji (1989) DVD NTSC, color & b/w, 46 min

Genre: Experimental

Music by Takehisa Kosugi A fine introduction to classic Japanese gardens and the concept of MA. -- Scott MacDonald, Afterimage The early sixteenth-century Japanese garden in the Zen temple of Ryoan-ji, in Kyoto, is considered a masterpiece of the karesansui or "dry landscape" style... In this film, the viewer is invited to experience the garden as an embodiment of ma, a Japanese concept that conveys both time and space... The aesthetic of the film is the message, it has the quality of an experimental film, a conceptual film-an artwork in itself. Good balance of music/visuals/titles. If not as compelling for some viewers as for others, still rated as very effective. Makes one want to visit the actual garden and experience its spiritual energy. -- Art on Screen, edited by Nadine Covert, New York

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

New York Day and Night (1989) DVD NTSC, color, 56 min

Genre: Experimental

This is not a sight seeing film but a poetic journey through light and darkness reflected on the city of New York where I often found empty spaces and times like Ma in Japanese . You do not often see the people walking on the streets or in the buildings. But you may feel the air and the light are coming and going. It's not a deserted city, but full of energy that is there even without the people. You see the wind is blowing as the bubbles are floating over Wall Street, then up, up to the sky. The Sun sets under the Washington Bridge where all the cars are running slowly like ants shot from afar. The night falls down among the skyscrapers yet the horizon is still light. Suddenly people are... (T.I.)

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Fluxus Replayed (1991) DVD NTSC, b/w, 30 min

Genre: Experimental

Destroying a violin by Nam June Paik, and rolling up with bandage all over the body of the players in a concert by Yoko Ono, with such radical actions Fluxus (an art group organized by George Maciunas) shocked not only art world, but also a society at large. A historical document of international avant-garde group, Fluxus performances in New York, 1991, which reproduced the performances in early 1960s, an origin of art-performance, with the works of the main artists: Nam June Paik, Yoko Ono, Dick Higgins, George Brecht, Allison Knowles, Ben Patterson, Jackson Mac Low and Emmett Williams. --T. I.

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Takahiko Iimura at the Lux film, video, cd-rom, installation (1998) , min

Book, 63 pages. Contents: Takahiko Iimura at the Lux by Helen de Witt / Takahiko Iimura - Getting the Measure of Time by Malcolm Le Grice / Identity in the Video of Takahiko Iimura by Takahiko Iimura / A Semiology of Video by Takahiko Iimura / Biography

Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Interactive: A I U E O NN Six Features (1999) , min

CD-ROM, Mac and Windows, approx.10 min. Consisting of two pieces: 1)"Interactive", 2) "A game of words which starts with the letter A" "Iimura deconstructs our coherence as he shifts between the English Roman alphabet and Japanese characters, injects spoken Japanese and manipulates the computer images of his features. The images often take on geometrical shapes, others recall the classical images from Japanese woodcuts of Samurai warrior grimace." -- Robert West, Curator, Mint Museum of Art, N. C. Awarded, Athens International Video Festival, Athens, Ohio, 1996, Columbus International Film/Video Festival, Columbus, Ohio, "Honorable Mention", 1996. New York Festival, Finalists 1995. WRO Sound Basis Visual Art Festival, Wroclaw, Poland, 1993, Festival Mundial do Minuto, Sao Paulo,1993. (All video version)

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

A I U E O N N Six Features (1994) DVD NTSC, b/w, 15 min

Genre: Experimental

Produced by Takahiko Iimura. Utilizes "System G," Real Time Three-Dimensional Texture Mapping developed by Sony. Combining the comical and the absurd, I created six funny faces to animate the images of Japanese vowels in the difference of "Image," "Letter" and "Voice." "Iimura deconstructs our coherence as he shifts between the English Roman alphabet and Japanese characters, injects spoken Japanese and manipulates the computer images of his features. The images often take on geometrical shapes, others recall the classical images from Japanese woodcuts of a Samurai warrior grimace." -- Robert West, Curator, Mint Museum of Art Awards and Exhibition: One Minute World Festival, São Paulo; many other festivals. Video sale prices: 70.00 individual / 140.00 institutional

Rental: $70.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $70.00

Takahiko Iimura

Talking in New York (1994) , 18 min

A sentence from Jacqus Derrida: "I hear myself at the same time that I speak" ("Speech and Phenomena", translated by David B. Allison, Northwestern University Press, 1973, Japanese translation by Takahiko Iimura), which he calls "phenomenological essence", was quoted, uttered in English and Japanese or monologued (without uttering) in syncronized or desynchronized voices with the picture at various locations in New York. The film is intended to simulate or dissimulate the sentence uttering it in the environment. The quoted sentence was also altered to "I speak to myself at the same time that I hear" and was connected to the original, then it becomes a palindrome combining the dialogue and the monologue within myself.

Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

Seeing / Hearing / Speaking (2002) DVD NTSC, color, 33 min

Consisting of four pieces: (see titles for descriptions) 1) "Seeing / Hearing / Speaking" (2002) 7 min. 2) "Talking to Myself" (1978, revised in 2001) 7 min. 3)"Talking in New York"(1981, revised in 2001) 8 min. 4) "Talking to Myself at PS1" (1985) 11 min. and the text of A Letter to Takahiko Iimura by David B. Allison. A multimedia with video, text, graphics and animation. Co-produced with The Institute for Electronic Arts, Alfred University, New York, and Euphonic Inc., Tokyo and produced with a grant from New York State Council on the Arts. "Seeing / Hearing / Speaking'" DVD, which I have enjoyed very much indeed. It is, I think, a true masterpiece. .. because through your DVD one becomes able to grasp not only the theoretical or intellectual aspect of your relationship with Derrida's thought, but the ' vertigo' (as Allison says) of the 'deconstruction' (to use Derrida's jargon) of your own identity, i. e. a feeling, not an abstraction: a pre- or proto-theoretical full way of understanding and of living, i. e. an intuition of the 'difference' or 'differance' in Derrida's sense." -- Daniel Charles, author of "John Cage" This is a Region 2 DVD

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

MA: A Japanese Concept (2004) , min

"Ma", a traditional Japanese word/concept for both meanings of "In Between" and "Intervals" as Space/Time as one. The DVD consists of four films all related of the concept of "Ma" in four different film style: Art, Document, Animation, Abstraction: MA: SPACE/TIME IN THE GARDEN OF RYOAN-JI (1989) Color, 16 min. Produced for Program for Art on Film, New York, with support from Metropolitan Museum for Art, New York, & J. Paul Getty Trust, Los Angeles. Music : Takehisa Kosugi, Text : Arata Isozaki, With the classic Zen garden of Ryoan-ji temple in Kyoto built in 16th century, the film does not illustrate "MA" but realizes "MA" through experiencing the film. THE MAKING OF "MA" IN RYOAN-JI (1989) B/W and Color, 8 min., Sound A video documentary of the making of the first film in which computer was used to control a certain slow speed of the dolly. Original, personal to integrate a philosophical agenda with a visual one.- Nadine Covert ed. Art On Screen, New York MA : THE STONES HAVE MOVED (2004) B/W and Color, 10 min., Silent An animated video, the outline of stones, taken from the still images, was drawn continuously like traditional "Ippitsu-ga"(one stroked drawing) with a breath MA (INTERVALS) (1977) B&W and Color, 10 min. (Excerpt out of 22 min.), Sound A complete abstract film only using black film, which blocks light, and clear film, which is totally transparent, as the basic materials, adding black with a white scratched line in the center, and clear with a black scratched line also in the center. These materials were measured in every second, a length of 1, 2, 3 seconds individually, as a basic unit. --T. I. This is a Region Free DVD

Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Experimental Films of the 1960s (2004) DVD NTSC, b/w, 42 min

Genre: Experimental

Compilation DVD comprised of Kuzu(Junk), AI(Love), On Eye Rape and A Dance Party in the Kingdom of Lilliput, see titles for descriptions.

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Talking Picture (1981-2013) DVD_NTSC, color_BW, 35 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: film about film, structural

Talking Picture (The Structure of Film Viewing) 1981, B&W,15 minutes Shadowman (The Structure of Seeing/Hearing) 1984/2008, color, 8 min. Making An Audience 2006/2013, color, 12 min. "In this collection of videos,Talking Picture (The Structure of Film Viewing)and Shadowman (The Structure of Seeing/Hearing), and Making An Audience, Takahiko Iimura presents a series of mind-twisting videos, meditating on the experience of watching film/video and of seeing and being seen. Prodded by a succession of riddles, the videos are lined with ...,Iimura touches on a range of significant philosophical questions about linguistics and the nature of representation itself.

Rental: $70
DVD NTSC Rental: $70

Akiko Iimura

Late Lunch (1985) DVD NTSC, color, 30 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: arts & artists, hand-processed, music, spiritual/mystical

Film & music poetry. 16mm to digital.

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Jack Wright III

Scramble (1969) 16mm, color, 3 min

Genre: Experimental

Rental: $20.00
16mm Rental: $20.00

Takahiko Iimura

Early Conceptual Videos (2005) DVD NTSC, black and white, 23 min

This DVD contains following 5 videos in excerpts. A Chair (1970) 6min Blinking (1970) 2min. Time Tunnel (1971)5min. Man and Woman (1971) 2min. Visual Logic (and Illogic) (1977) 8min. Total 23min. Here is one of the starting points of Japanese video art. After coming back from New York in 1969, Taka iimura started video production in Tokyo. Working in experimental film since the early 1960s, he first combined the art of film with video thus making a kind of flicker effect in video in two pieces: "A Chair" (1970) and "Blinking" (1970). These videos are experiments in perception, and are very minimal in form consisting of a single object which requires a lot of attention. "Time Tunnel" (1971) is an attempt at time travel in a very conseptual sense. "Man and Woman" (1971) shows full body shots of a naked man and woman shot from above without movement: stills. They are shown alone as well as together one over (or under) the other symbolizing in words at the same time, their positions. "Visual Logic (and Illogic)" (1977) shows visual logic (and illogic) of sign combining with limited movements of camera for panning and zooming. These early videos signify very early experiments of a particular "conceptual video, " that almost no other video artists had ever tried at that time. Furthermore this is an important collection to clarify later developments of the art of iimura's video. (T.I.)

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Cine Dance: The Butoh of Tatsumi Hijikata (2005) DVD NTSC, b/w, 33 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: body, dance

See the individual film description of ANNMA (THE MASSEUR) (1963) and ROSE COLOR DANCE (1963).

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

I Am (Not) Seen (2003) , min

Made for the opening piece of the DVD, "Seeing / Hearing / Speaking," this piece questions "Seeing" while the words, "I am seen" and "I am not seen," are blinking simulteneously over the pixilated faces, another words, "I see you," on a still picture interfare them.These words are superimposed over the pictures of a face, eyes, and a face in the frames. The title, "I am (Not) Seen," indicates both the positive and the negative cases with the parenthesis.The piece suggests that even I may not be seen by you, I still see you. Racially speaking, Asian American are invisible(not seen) as black in the USA, yet I see you(white)-- T.I.

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Experiments in New York (1967-1984) DVD NTSC, color & b/w, 29 min

Genre: Experimental

New York Scenes, 1967, 10min. color & b/w New York Hot Springs, 1984, 11min. b/w Talking in New York, 1981, 8min. b/w (Collection of The Donnel Library, New York City) The first, "New York Scenes," 1967, is sketches of certain scenes and portraits of the filmmaker's friends and other people. It is divided into five "chapters" including, a famous filmmaker, Jack Smith with his film "Flaming Creatures." The film is made with one scene per chapter, and the chapters are "Linda with a lens," "Jack Smith with his film "Flaming Creatures," "Fire hydrants on Broadway," "Akiko on the roof," and "A Hippy in the Central Park." The second film, "New York Hot Springs," 1984, was made with the steam coming out of manholes, a typical scene in the winter on the streets of New York,which reminded him of the Japanese hot springs in volcanic mountains. Consisting of shots of various steam at 10 locations in the city, the film is edited with each shot (5 seconds) in successive order and is rotated 10 times. A kind of Structural Film you might say. Since the form of the steam changes every moment, you are looking at new steam even at the same location. The third film, "Talking in New York," 1981, is a kind of first person cinema where iimura is the cameraman as well as the actor. Acting like a total stranger in the city who does not speak or hear the language, he walks with a camera to such sight-seeing spots as Times Square,and the top of the Empire State building, etc., only listening to himself speaking the words: "I hear myself at the same time that I speak" in two languages: Japanese and English.The words are a quotation from the book by Jacques Derrida, French philosopher, which he calls "phenomenological essence." (T.I)

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

On Time In Film/DVD (1975-2007) DVD NTSC, b/w, 33 min

Genre: Experimental

This DVD contains the films: + & -, 1 to 60 Seconds, and 24 Frames Per Second "Time is, as it has been said by John Cage on music, the most important issue in film".(Takahiko Iimura) "in concentrating on this set of problems, often wrongly seen as 'minimalist', Iimura went much, much further than any other film artist in exploring a kind of art-science. This concern with the experience of time, its measured passage and the analogy between time and space, has been the main recurring theme at the centre of his work." (Malcolm Le Grice, the author of "Abstract Film and Beyond", MIT Press) "During the past five years the concern which Iimura explored in Models have reached their most complete refinement in +&-, 1 to 60 seconds, and 24 Frames Per Second." (Scott MacDonald)

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

For Filmic Meditation (1969-2007) DVD NTSC, color & b/w, 42 min

Genre: Experimental

This DVD contains the films: In The River, and Shutter. "I hope you could re-experience through these two films in which I found that a thinking in film comes through silent meditation from the experience of the memory of a man in sacred river in Katmandu and the hallucination of flickering lights." (T.I.) "Iimura used the process of re-photography, but in this instance, the screen was the tiny viewer of a 16mm editor. Using various camera speeds and in-camera superimpositions, Iimura analyzed some footage he had made in Katmandu of a man taking a bath in a sacred river. The finished film develops an interesting parallel between the man's careful bathing as the river flows past and Iimura's careful analysis of the man's physically simpler activities as the film flows through the camera." (Scott MacDonald) "Using two projector speeds and various camera speeds, he photographed the light thrown onto a screen by a projector with no film running through it. Because of the disparities between the speeds of the camera and projector shutters, the resulting footage, which he printed first in positive, then in negative, creates a series of flicker effects which are even more powerful." (Scott MacDonald)

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

Takahiko Iimura

Japanese Experimental Films - 1970s (1972-76) 16mm, color & bw, 64 min

Genre: Experimental

A program of Japanese experimental films produced in the 1970s. Assembled by Takahiko Iimura and first exhibited at the Millennium Film Workshop ca. 1978.

Reel 1:
KIRI (Sakumi Hagiwara, 1972), 8 min.
A fixed camera photographs a fog-shrouded landscape. At first the screen appears almost totally white, but gradually the features begin to reveal themselves. Shot without the aid of time-lapse photography, the film bears a conscious resemblance to sumie paintings.
ORANDA-JIN NO SHASHIN (Photograph of the Dutch) (Isao Koda, 1976), 7 min.
Beginning with photographs of his own feet wading in a stream. Koda first establishes a labyrinthian 'photo within a photo' theme, then presents several variations involving speed, order, number of images, and color.
SYNC SOUND (Takahiko Iimura, 1975), 9 min.
Following the order of the academy's synchronization leader which is used for picture and sound to synch, the film adopts the system for its own order (or may be fallen out of order). Instead of using the order normal way which goes counting the numbers 10 to 3 to match at 0 the picture with the sound, the film replaces the number one by one to single dot sound which expected to be read by the viewer to have the imaginary synchronization. The film repeats until all the numbers are replaced by the sounds.
LUMIERE (Tsuneo Nakai, 1971), 3 min.
A single shot of the sea, played with an synchronized soundtrack and made to change in color.

Reel 2:
FEEDBACK (Nobuhiro Kawanaka, 1973), 8 min.
Photographs of a nude, arranged into stop-motion sequences on the left half of the screen, are juxtaposed with a close-up of the film itself passing in front of a viewer, gradually revealed on the right half of the screen. Again we are confronted with the basic conundrum that a moving series of still pictures creates the illusion of movement within the pictures themselves.
10 SEC. (Ryoichi Enomoto, 1973), 8 min.
A single ten-second sequence by a dancer has been photographed at several speeds, which are then replayed at different speeds with freezes and multiple exposures added. The short French phrases that appear between sequences are merely conjunctions and connectives, such as 'but what if,' 'and then,' etc. Here , as in 'Le Cinema,' the nature of motion captured on film is interpreted through dissection and reconstruction.
OBSERVATION (Hiroshi Yamazaki, 1975), 10 min.
The film is composed of two sequences: 1) A simple scene of a street corner taken from a window is given the appearance of dawn, then illumination, then blinding light through the use of a single gradual filter change; 2) Shots of the position of the midday sun on 27 consecutive days, taken through a dense day-for-night filter, are superimposed, creating an eerie arc of heavenly bodies.
ATMAN (Toshio Masumoto, 1975), 11 min
The title is a Hindu term meaning the World Soul from which all souls derive, or more simply, a principle of life. Matsumoto tried to 'create' a microcosm (with a devil figure at the center), by dividing a field into 10 equidistant concentric circles, marking 48 equidistant points on the circumference of each circle, and shooting the 'devil' from the resulting 480 angles.

"The proclamation of sensibility was the pronounced feature unifying the disparate films [in this program]: this sensibility is one dedicated to an acceptance of irony as an aesthetic integer. Seeming to duplicate the formal devices of 'the structural film', these films develop along a distinct principle of gratification." - Daryl Chin, "The Future of an Illusion (ism): Notes on the New Japanese Avant-Garde Film," Millennium Film Journal 1:2 (Spring-Summer, 1978), 87.

Rental: $150.00
16mm Rental: $150.00

Takahiko Iimura

Air's Rock (1985-2008) DVD NTSC, color, 29 min

Genre: Experimental

A huge isolated rock in the midst of desert in Australia: Ayers Rock. I produced two films around this rock, however, they are very contrasting in the way the films were made. Originally I produced the second film "Ayers Rock" for a laserdisc by the Pioneer company as part of a series of "Environmental Video," (typically, a lengthy fixed scene of , for example, a water fall with traditional Japanese music, a kind of video wall-painting), which was popular in the middle of the 1980s. As the document of its making, "Moments At The Rock" shot with an amateur video camera, is the first piece presented here. This camera got strange halations from the strong sunshine in the desert of Australia, and I was quite surprised by the result which surpassed the color change caused by nature over the rock. This film was awarded Grand Prize at Edison Int'l Film Festival, and was appreciated in advance of the other film as an experimental film far more than a document of the making of the laserdisc. The "Ayers Rock" released by the Pioneer company sold well with the popularity of Jazz pianist, Richie Byrach. But since I was not satisfied by the so called "Environmental Video," I drastically re-edited as "A Rock In The Light", and requested the music of Haruyuki Suzuki, contemporary composer. Different from the Jazz music, this music is unified with the image, which is far more visually structured, concepturising the passing of time and, I believe, this one went much further than the previous work. (T.I.)

Rental: $60.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $60.00

Takahiko Iimura

Eye For Eye, Ear for Ear (1966-70/2009) DVD NTSC, b/w, 25 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: Films About Film

When I came to the USA in the mid 1960s, it was the high point of the Hippie movement and the black riots. I lived in the East village in New York, which was a center of the former, and watched TV news of the latter often. These two films, Film Strips I and II, were taken from the scenes respectively, not as a documentary but as an inner report of mine, abstracted yet chaotic. (T.I)

Rental: $60.00

Takahiko Iimura

Performance/Myself (Or Video Identity) (1972-1995) DVD NTSC, color & b/w, 29 min

Genre: Experimental

Includes: "Self-Identity", "Double Identity", "Double Portrait", "I Love You", "This Is A Camera Which Shoots This", "As I See You You See Me", and "I Am A Viewer, You Are A Viewer". Performance related works not only as the document but also involving the video system in its realization with the words conceptually. (TI) "The aptly titled "Performance/Myself," seven part series of epistemologically complex excerpts and stand alone experiments is fashioned from deceptively simple concepts: Iimura simultaenously "live" on screen and inside a television monitor pronouncing . . ." -- Michael Joshua Rowin, City Arts, New York's Review of Culture, April 6, 2010.

Rental: $70.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $70.00

Takahiko Iimura

DVD Art of Takahiko Iimura (2006) DVD NTSC, color & b/w, 12 min

Genre: Experimental

A collection of Takahiko Iimura's 12 experimental DVDs in 60 second excerpts, covering 40 years (1962-2002) of his film and video art. The DVDs excerpted are: "60s Experiments", "Cine Dance: The Butoh of Tatsumi Hijikata", "Experiments in New York", " Filmmakers", "Early Conceptual Videos", "John Cage Performs James Joyce", "New York Day and Night: A Journey Through Light and Darkness", "MA, A Japanese Concept", "Fluxus Replayed", "AIUEONN: Six Features", "Seeing/Hearing/Speaking". (TI)

Rental: $30.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $30.00

Takahiko Iimura

Writing With Light: White Calligraphy (1967-2010) DVD NTSC, b/w, min

Genre: Experimental

Includes: "White Calligraphy, Re-Read", "Performance 1: White Calligraphy", "Performance 2: White Calligraphy". "In White Calligraphy, Re-Read, Takahiko Iimura returns to his early work. White Calligraphy which he originally made in 1967 by scratching characters from 'Kojiki', an early Japanese text, into the frames of 16mm black leader. In this re-reading of the illegible work the film is slowed down and briefly arrested at random using digital processing while suddenly legible words are voiced by the artist in an accompanying soundtrack. Part translation (not only between Japanese and English but between media languages) part abstract interplay of picture sound and word." -- Dr. Duncan White (University of Arts London.)

Rental: $70.00

Takahiko Iimura

videopoem: Sky and Ground (1994) DVD NTSC, color, 30 min

Genre: Experimental

Sky and ground which was cut off momentarily / A camera wanders seeking its own shadow / The images which explore the limit / of solitude in New York / A mythological verbal space in which / snakes and birds are intermingled / A unique world where these images / and words meet. (TI)

Rental: $60.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $60.00

Takahiko Iimura

Desade (1963) 16mm, BW, 10 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: art, body, erotic

From the collector of Marquis de Sade in the early 1960s, still a 'dark age ' of erotic picture, even his novels were forbidden to publish in Tokyo, I burrowed the copies of the engraving taken from the 18th century edition of "The story of Juliette" and of "The story of Justine." and rearranged along a story made from of the pictures not from the novels. An exercise out of the curiosity. It was the same year I made Ai(Love) in 1962 which consists of mostly extreme close-ups of love making. I have kept DeSade for many years in my closet without looking at it myself and have forgotten about it. By a chance I re-found the film 50 years later that there is something worth to see.(T.I, 2012)

Rental: $40.00
16mm Rental: $40.00

Isidore Isou

On Venom and Eternity (Traite de Bave et D'Eternite) (1951) DVD PAL, B/W, 120 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: art

Founder in 1945 of the Letterist movement, precursor to Situationism, Fluxus, conceptual art and the happening, Isidore Isou invented the "discrepant," "chiseled" cinema in his key film ON VENOM AND ETERNITY. The film created a scandal in Cannes in 1951 (the Letterists arrived uninvited but Cocteau awarded it the avant-garde prize and later designed the poster), and heralded a new approach to avant-garde film. "The spectator must leave the cinema blind, his ears crushed, both torn asunder by this disjunction of word and image. The rupture between language and photography will form what I call DISCREPANT CINEMA. I hereby announce the manifesto of discrepant cinema!" - Isidore Isou

DVD PAL Sale: $39.00 Individual Home-Use Only

Takahiko Iimura

On Duration in Film (1972/2010) DVD NTSC, b/w, 39 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: structural

Includes: 2 Minutes 46 Seconds 16 Frames (100 feet) (1972/2010) 16mm/dvd, 8min. 33sec. 1 To 60 Seconds (1973/2010) 16mm/dvd, 30min. 30sec. I asked John Cage about his piece 4 Minutes 33 seconds(1952),discussing the conceptual title of the piece. Time itself becomes the title of the piece. John said that it's not just the time but also a space, and I responded by discussing the Japanese concept of ma, which is a concept that construes time and space as inextricably linked. I also made a piece called 2 Minutes 46 Seconds 16 Frames (100 feet), made in 1972, which was inspired by his piece. In the beginning, I chronologically wrote down the numbers one to twenty-four on each frame for 100 feet of film. Then I chronologically wrote down the numbers one to sixty, but this time every second (every 24 frames), and did this twice. It was an attempt to show that time is also distance, especially with film. - Takahiko Iimura, from the interview by Julian Ross, 2010 A screening of 1 To 60 Seconds at Utica college in 1976 is a case in point...After a few seconds many members of the audience had recognized that the numbers were in some definite order and that the passages of dark leader which separated the frames with the numbers had some specific relationship to numbers themselves.....everyone I talked with or saw was intensely experiencing the film by remaining acutely conscious of the passage of time and of the stately progression of Iimura's film in the theater. - Scott MacDonald, Afterimage, April 1978 In 1 To 60 Seconds Iimura does an extraordinary thing: he abstracts time from any concrete associations, seems to put it on the screen and there you sit looking at (or for) it, experiencing it. The film is all black leader except for the numbers 1 to 60 that appear individually in sequence to indicate the amount of time in seconds that each of them followed one second letter by a number or numbers indicating the total amount of time that has thus far transpired. So at each juncture you know beforehand how much time awaits you before the next and how much is behind you, and then it's just you and the black screen. - Paul Poggiali, The Soho Weekly News, New York, May 9 1974

Rental: $60.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $60.00

Takahiko Iimura

Early Film Poems (1962-71) DVD NTSC, , 44 min

Genre: Experimental

I made these six short films during a decade of 1962 through 1971, the first 10 years of my filmmaking though the order in the DVD goes backward from 1971 to 1962. Besides this collection I have already published another package of the films made in the 1960 60s Experiments consisted of four films made during 1962-64. The films of this new collection have not shown much during past decades and myself re-discovered lately these ones as a sort of film poem. "Film poem" is a term used in the 1960 for experimental film burrowing from literature field. It means non-narrative and short form mostly. Also it often meant lyrical as well though not necessarily so. In this collection it starts from lyrical The Pacific Ocean(1971) and ends up not lyrical, DADA62 which is descriptive and often metaphorical at the same time. Between them there are varied sense of poem. (T.I) Iro (Colors) (1962) 10 min. First projected onto Jiro Takamatsu's naked back at the legendary Sogetsu Art Center for the performance Screen Play, Colors is an experiment in concoction. Iimura drops paint into oil and water and melts wax as he films the colors take shape whilst simultaneously dissolving into one another. An eerie soundtrack by Yasunao Tone of Group Ongaku and Fluxus creates an impression of music being the witch behind the craft. (Julian Ross, University of Reeds) Dada 62 (1962) Yomiuri Independent was an annual show between 1949-1963 that exhibited all art that was submitted. Artists in the early 60s began to take advantage of the challenge by provoking the organizers with their submissions that cast a question on the framework of art within the gallery space. The objet d'art and performances we see in Dada 62 are fragments of what was shown in its 1962 version with pieces by Genpei Akasegawa, Jiro Takamatsu and Shinmei Kojima making an appearance.(In case of the performance in 1963, Iimura interpreted a graphic score by Yasunao Tone in his projection of the film at the Naiqua Gallery where he performed the projector as an instrument. As usual for Iimura, the piece is not simply a document but an interaction with the art he films.)(Julian Ross, University of Reeds)

Rental: $90.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $90.00

Takahiko Iimura

Screen Play (1963/2012) DVD NTSC, color, 10 min

Genre: Experimental

SCREEN PLAY is a film performance at Place M, Tokyo, in 2012. SCREEN PLAY was first performed in 1963 at Sogetsu Art Center, Tokyo, with participation of Hi Red Center. A film IRO (Colors) (1962) which mixes different paints, is projected with music by Yasunao Tone.

Rental: $40.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $40.00

Takahiko Iimura

Seeing Through The Body (2007) DVD_NTSC, color, min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: arts & artists, body, dance

Seeing Through The Body
with Yayoi Kusama, with Mario Montez

Flower
1968-69, 11 min, color, music: Tomomi Adachi (2007)
With: Yayoi Kusama (Body Painting) with the performers Akiko Iimura

While I was staying in New York in the 1960s during the rise of the hippie movement, I filmed performances of body painting artist, Kusama Yayoi, together with the performers. As I wasn't satisfied with merely documenting her performance, made super-impositions of flowers over the performance, more as a film poem than a documentary, since flowers was the symbol of the hippie movement as given the name "flower children." The performance, however, is not always in the foreground, but is woven like fabric among the superimposed flowers. Furthermore another female figure (Akiko Iimura) is inserted with her kimono contrasting to the scenes of Kusama's. The film ends symbolically in long shots a flower patterned dress with no body is suspended over the Empire State Building behind. Nearly 40 years later Tomomi Adachi composed music for the film. (T.I)

Face
1968-69, 19 min, color, music: Mario Montez, Donna Kerness, Linda / Voice Over: Akiko Iimura

In the same year that 'Flowers' was produced I happened to make the acquaintance of Mario Montex, a superstar of Andy Warhol's films whose name was taken after one time Hollywood Star, Mario Montez. I was attracted by his transvestite beauty. In addition to Mario's performance I also shot the performances by Donna Kerness, who had appeared in the black comedy of the Kuchar brothers' underground films, and Linda who was a personal acquaintance. Fiction and reality collide in microscopic montage with the sexual performances limited to only facial expressions in extreme close-up of those three females (including Mario). These close-ups were inherited from my earlier Love (1962), but this time the film was shot in color and focused on individual action. Perhaps the viewer's visual experience will be mixed, blurring the line between fiction and reality. A big, laughing voice throughout the film may sound , yet at the same time the nature of life will fuse (or alienates for some) all. (T.I)

Rental: $50
DVD NTSC Rental: $50

Takahiko Iimura

Seeing / Hearing / Speaking (2002) DVD NTSC, , 26 min

Genre: Experimental, Installation

Keywords: body

A multimedia DVD/video with text, video (33 min), graphics and animation, 2002.

A multimedia/interactive DVD: "Seeing/Hearing/Speaking" has two parts, a new video, 2001. The total running time of the video is 33min, which may be seen continuously by clicking "Autoplay" at the menu. (The video version has only first part: "Seeing/Hearing/Speaking", 7min, b/w.)

Based on a sentence taken from the seminal book of Jacques Derrida, French philosopher, "Speech and Phenomena" translated by David B. Allison, I produced first video "Taking to Myself" in 1978 (revised in 2001). The video was highly appreciated as "the strongest, most effective statement one could make from the work of Derrida" by Professor Allison. The sentence I quoted, that Derrida calls "phenomenological essence", is that I hear myself at the same time that I speak.

The new DVD, not just a transfer of video, extends further with text, and graphics, which work interactively. In "Hearing/Speaking", for instance, you can choose among the monitors with the picture of face, head, ear and mouth in the video-installation, and can read/see different programs. So that you can perceive and localize "Hearing/Speaking" with the organs. Together with "Seeing" in this DVD, I could combine the perception of "Seeing" with "Hearing/Speaking". Besides "Talking to Myself", other related videos are "Talking in New York" (1981, revised in 2001) and "Talking to Myself at PS1" (1985).

Throughout these videos I have examined the validity of an identity in video, which is different from the actual voice, between "the I who hear" and "the I who speak." It extends also to "the I who see" and "the I who is seen". The text includes "A letter to Takahiko Iimura" by David B. Allison, and "On Talking to Myself" by Takahiko Iimura. (T.I)

Also available a four channel DVD installation, which requires 4 DVD projectors and speakers.

Rental: $50
DVD NTSC Rental: $50

Akiko Iimura

Mon Petit Album (1973) DVD NTSC, color, 10 min

Genre: Experimental

Keywords: arts & artists, music, personal/diary/journal, spiritual/mystical

Film poetry with music of Jacques Bekaert played by David Behman and Takehisa Kosugi. 16mm to digital.

Rental: $50.00
DVD NTSC Rental: $50.00

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