Christopher MacLaine

Christopher
MacLaine

“Any expression of the human mind (soul? id? ego?) is to be valued, if not for its excellence, at least for its daring. ”

Christopher Maclaine, a beat poet of the 1940s and 50s living in San Francisco, made only four films in his lifetime; the first and longest two: The End (1953), which is 35 minutes, and the 14-minute The Man Who Invented Gold (1957) present the profoundest challenge to viewer identification I know of. Avoiding the extreme (though brilliant) conceptual anticinema of such filmmakers as Maurice Lemaitre, Maclaine tells stories based in social reality but in a manner so profoundly fragmented, so unnerving, as to give even viewers who have seen the works many times a series of perceptual shocks. Among the greatest films I have ever seen, these twin fables of doom and redemption are also unlike any others I know. After perhaps 20 viewings of The End over the past 30 years, I feel as if I am only beginning to understand its greatness. - Fred Camper

Films

  • Read More
    Beat Films
    Experimental

    Beat Films
    Christopher MacLaine

    color and b/w, sound, 61 min
    Rental format: DVD PAL
    • Arts / Artists
    • History
  • Read More
    End, The
    Experimental

    End, The
    Christopher MacLaine

    16mm, color and b/w, sound, 34.75 min
    Rental format: 16mm
    • philosophical
    • political_socialactivism
  • Read More
    Man Who Invented Gold, The
    Experimental

    Man Who Invented Gold, The
    Christopher MacLaine

    16mm, color, sound, 14 min
    Rental format: 16mm
    • literary_theatre
  • Read More
    Beat
    Experimental

    Beat
    Christopher MacLaine

    16mm, color, sound, 6 min
    Rental format: 16mm
    • political_socialactivism
  • Read More
    Scotch Hop
    Experimental

    Scotch Hop
    Christopher MacLaine

    16mm, color, sound, 5.5 min
    Rental format: 16mm
    • dance

Biography

Christopher Maclaine, a beat poet of the 1940s and 50s living in San Francisco, made only four films in his lifetime; the first and longest two: The End (1953), which is 35 minutes, and the 14-minute The Man Who Invented Gold (1957) present the profoundest challenge to viewer identification I know of. Avoiding the extreme (though brilliant) conceptual anticinema of such filmmakers as Maurice Lemaitre, Maclaine tells stories based in social reality but in a manner so profoundly fragmented, so unnerving, as to give even viewers who have seen the works many times a series of perceptual shocks. Among the greatest films I have ever seen, these twin fables of doom and redemption are also unlike any others I know. After perhaps 20 viewings of The End over the past 30 years, I feel as if I am only beginning to understand its greatness. - Fred Camper